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Scenic Route of British Columbia 




THE RAILWAY WITH A PERSONALITY" 
SERVING 

THE CARIBOO" 
CENTRAL 

AND 

NORTHERN 
BRITISH COLUMBIA 



reased if you know something about the country through which 
mountain peak and that river — a little of the history behind 
.1 im you in identifying some of the main points of interest 
h Dock and Quesnel, B. C. 

:elephone poles both sides of the track. Watch 



MILE 


ALT. 


POINTS OF INTEREST 







Squamish Dock— Head of Howe Sound and Southern Terminus of the Pacific Great 
Fa tun Railway. Looking north from Squamish Dock, an excellent view of Mount 
Garibaldi (8,787 ft.) is obtained. Arising from Howe Sound to the east, there is 
considerable Rock Formation. 


1 


10' 


Squamish — Population approximately 1,200. Operational headquarters of the 
Pacific Great Eastern Railway. 


8 


150' 


Passengers may obtain another good view of Mount Garibaldi from this Point. 


9.5 


160' 


The Checkye River is crossed— Get your Camera ready! 


11.9 


189' to 
1126' 


From this point on the Railway follows the Cheakamus River to the left and com- 
mences to climb the two per cent grade of the "Coast Range." Here is the famous 
Cheakamus Canyon. From approximately Mile 16 to 18 the River boils through this 
narrow gorge; the Railway clinging to its ledge crosses several ravines on high 
steel bridges, q^^^fy ^/ fn9 *#/'*■* 


33 


1900' 


Train again follows the Cheakamus River for a short distance. 


38 


2099' 


Rainbow on Alta Lake. At this point a good view of Mountain Peaks may be 
obtained to the right of the Tram. 


41 


1927' 


Green Lake — from this point "Wedge" Mountain can be seen; also at this point 
the descent to the Pemberton Valley is begun, following Green River on the right 
of the Train. 


51.5 


1123' 


Green River disappears in a Gorge, below which is Green River Falls. 


57.3 


695' 


Pemberton distribution centre for the fertile Pemberton Valley. The British Columbia 
Government i, reclaim, nt; land in this area from the River. A short distance further 
on the Railway crosses the "Lillooet River." 


61.9 


6S6' 


Creekside (formerly Chilsampton), the largest Indian Reserve in B. C. From this 


65 


1286' 


The Birkenhead River is crossed and parallels the Railway to Mile 71. 


76.3 


1575' 


Birken "Summit" of the grade 1,575 feet above sea level. Birken Lake is seen on the 
right. The train then descends the grade through rugged mountain scenery covered 
with dense forests. British Columbia Electric Company towers carrying electricity 


83 


870' 


Devine — A large lumber mill demonstrates the timber wealth in this area. 


86 


880' 


D'Arcy— At the head of Anderson Lake. The train follows the Western shore on 
a narrow rocky ledge. The mountains rise sharply from the lake on both sides. 


91.5 


879' 


McGillivray— Resort centre. McGillivray Falls is nearby. 


104 


828' 


B. C. Electric Co., Power Site— On the left you will see pipes down which water 
is carried from the mountain to the power house — seen on the opposite side of the 
train at the lake -edge. 


105.1 


813' 


Shalalth — The gateway to the famous Bridge River gold mining district of Bralorne, 
Pioneer and Minto mines. At this point a highway climbs over Mission Mountain. 


115 


800' 


North End of Seton Lake— Mount Brew (9,200 ft.) can be seen across the lake. 


120.4 


793' 


Lillooet— Divisional Point on the railway and distribution centre for farming and 

ranch pi'Hiu.r, Lillooet o .-, yyi\ old Ganhoo town and ha- several historic land 
marks. It is also Mile "0" or beginning of the famous Cariboo highway. 


122 


850' 


Railway crosses the Fraser River on a high steel and concrete bridge. From here the 
Railway follows the Fraser River Canyon. 


145 


2706' 


Above Moran Station, Mile 145.9, the Fraser River appears like a ribbon lying 
several thousand feet below the tracks. From this point the train enters the rolling 
cattle country of the Cariboo. 


165.7 


3166' 


< -i'Moi --Heionc Cauhoo town, lamem- during stagecoach days. 


178 


3 508' 


Chasm. This immense canyon, hundreds of feet deep and over a mile long, was 
undoubtedly caused by a prehistoric phenomena. 


to 276. 


3550' to 


During the hours of darkness the train continues on through a rolling country covered 
with small lakes— Jack Pine and Poplar trees. 


205.9 


3862' 


Train arrives at the highest summit on the railway, viz., "Horse Lake"— altitude 
3,862 ft. above sea level. From this summit on a clear day the "Butte" can be seen, 
from which the town of "Lone Butte" derives its name. 


276 


1925' 


Williams Lake. A divisional Point on the Railway and the centre of an immense 

1 i i I II li 
are hipped each year to Canadian and U. S. markets. North of Williams Lake we 
again follow along the Fraser River. 


292. 


1800' 


Deep Creek is crossed. The deck of this bridge is 286 feet above the water. When 
constructed it was the highest bridge in the British Empire. The train continue- on 
through rich farming and ranching country. 




1549' 


Quesnel— Temporary Northern Terminus of the Railway, located at the junction 
of the Fraser and Quesnel Rivers. It is a very historic town of approximately 1,500 
population, and possesses many relics of early pioneer days. At this point a "Scenic 
Drive may be made in the Quesnel area during the stop-over between the arrival 

From Quesnel the Railway is presently under construction to Prince George, a dis- 
place Rivl 6 a'"' ""^ eVentUa " y ' il is ex P ected . ™11 be extended into the famous 
After a stop-over of approximately ten hours at this interesting point, we commence 

the return trip from Quesnel to Squam.sh and Va, II I 

opportunity of viewing, in the late twilight and early morning and afternoon light 
scenes and interesting points missed on the northbound trip. 



ROUTE OF THE 
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY